LOST HOSPITALS OF LONDON

A brief history of healthcare provision in London
VOLUNTARY HOSPITALS

HOMES FOR THE AGED

From Tudor times many charitable institutions provided homes for the aged.  These took the form of poorhouses, almshouses or asylums, mainly intended to provide shelter, rather than nursing care, for those still able to lead independent lives.

During the late 19th century many Poor Law infirmaries had in effect become residential care homes for poor aged and infirm people, that is, those who had become too old and ill to care for themselves.  It has been estimated that some 4% of the aged population lived in infirmaries (about the same percentageas those today living in state-supported care).


CHARITABLY-FUNDED HOMES

Hill Homes

Sir Thomas Lipton Memorial Home

Woodside Home

HOMES FUNDED BY RELGIOUS CHARITIES

French Protestant Hospital

Jewish Home of Rest

St Raphael's Home

KING'S FUND HOMES and HALFWAY HOUSES

Beechgrove Home for the Aged Sick

Holmhurst

Whittington

NHS-FUNDED HOMES and HOSPITALS

Abbots Langley Hospital

Barnes Hospital

Bow Arrow Hospital

Chadwell Heath Hospital

Ellesmere Hospital

Elmbank House

Greentrees

Harts Hospital

Honey Lane Hospital

Rame Home

St Benedict's Hospital

St Elizabeth's Home

St Stephen's Hospital

Thomas Barlow Home

By the 1980s government policy had changed.  To save money within the NHS, it was decided to close geriatric hospitals and the responsibility for placing the elderly in residential nursing homes passed to local authorities.


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