ALMSHOUSES OF LONDON

 

 

St Saviour's College

110 Hamilton Road, West Norwood, SE27 9SD

 

St Saviour's College - or Hospital of the Poor - originated from various almshouses founded in the parish of St Saviour, Southwark, during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, which were merged together by the Charity Commission. These included the almshouses of Thomas Cure, Henry Jackson, Henry Spratt and Henry Young. All located in Deadman's Place, they were forced to moved when the land on which they stood was purchased by the Charing Cross Railway Company in the early 1860s.

A rectangular piece of land of just over 8,000 square metres was purchased in West Norwood and the foundation stone for the College was laid in 1862.

The chapel, and the flanking south block containing 16 almshouses, were the first buildings to be completed in 1863.

By 1866 the west block and the western part of the north block were completed, as well as the entrance lodge. Built in the Victorian Gothic style, the 2-storey red brick buildings were arranged facing a central open quadrangle.

On one of the walls of the west wing were three stones inscribed:

THE GIFT OF HENRY SPRATT CARPENTER 1709

THE GUIFT OF MR. HENRY JACKSON BUILT IN THE YEARE 1685

THE GUIFT OF HENRY YOUNG IN THE YEARE 1690

By 1868 all the inhabitants in the almshouses of Deadman's Place had transferred to the new buildings, with the exception of those in Alleyn's Almshouses, who had moved to new premises in Gravel Lane, Southwark.

In 1884, when the east block had been completed, the residents of Alleyn's Almshouses in Gravel Lane transferred to this new accommodation. The foundation stone of Alleyn's Almshouses was mounted in a stone block and displayed in the garden.

In 1908 the north block was extended eastwards.

A Recreation Hall was added in 1913 to the northwest corner of the site.

In 1931 the entrance lodge was replaced by a 2-storey house and, in 1936, the south block was rebuilt, opening on 16th October 1937.

During WW2 (1939-1945), on 22nd July 1944, the east block was destroyed by a V1 flying bomb.

After the war the east block was rebuilt, opening on 18th October 1952.

In the 1960s the almshouses consisted of 64 dwellings - Nos. 1-12 in the east block, Nos. 13-28 in the south block, Nos. 29-48 in the west block and Nos. 49-64 in the north block.

In 2003 the site was sold to a housing association and, with the proceeds of the sale, new almshouses were built in Purley.

By September 2006 the almshouses had been vacated; their residents had moved to their new accommodation in St Saviour's Court.

 

Current status

The almshouse buildings, apart from the chapel, were demolished and the site was redeveloped by Fairview New Homes. Five blocks of varying storeys have been built - all Affordable Housing. They provide 89 dwellings, namely 27 one-bedroom, 49 two-bedroom and 13 three-bedroom apartments.

The chapel was considered too small for communal use and has been converted for residential use.

The development is known as Tannoy Square.

N.B. Photographs obtained in July 2020

St Saviour's College

The entrance to Tannoy Square.

St Saviour's College

New housing has been built around the central quadrangle.

St Saviour's College

The chapel, built in 1863, is the only surviving building of the College. It is now No. 57 Tannoy Square.

St Saviour's CollegeSt Saviour's College

On either side of the chapel door is a stone plaque.

The one on the left is inscribed: St. SAVIOUR'S SOUTHWARK. The sixteen Almshouses and the Chapel in the centre are The COLLEGE or HOSPITAL of the POOR of the Parish of St Saviour Southwark founded by THOMAS CURE ESQ. (Saddler to Queen Elizabeth) in the year 1597. Jackson's Almshouse, founded in 1660, Spratt's in 1694, Young's in 1694. THE THREE ALMSHOUSES were erected by subscription in 1832 and 1835 AND THE GRAVEL LANE ALMSHOUSES (in exchange for Alleyn's Soap-yard almshouses) were founded previous to 1671 and rebuilt by subscription in 1852.

The one on the right is inscribed: St. SAVIOUR'S SOUTHWARK. The various Almshouses and the Chapel within this Ground (described in the other Tablet) were erected in the years 1862 and 1863 during the Wardenship (for two years) of JAMES NEWTON Great Account, ROBERT TIFFIN Renter, JOHN HENRY MILLER College, GEORGE MANSELL Bell, CHARLES DYER FIELD Newcomen's, BENJAMIN KEDGLEY Young, Spratt and Jackson's. The First Stone was laid by JOHN HENRY MILLER, the College Warden, on the NINTH day of OCTOBER 1862. They were rebuilt on this ground in consequence of the site of the College and Ground in the Parish of St Saviour Southwark, whereupon they were originally erected and stood having been taken for the purposes of the Charing Cross Railway. HOWARD HABERSHON, Architect, HERBERT STURMY, Vestry Clerk.

 

Inscribed paving stones (below) are set into the path leading to the chapel.

St Saviour's College

The inscription reads: St SAVIOUR SOUTHWARK. THIS FOUNDATION STONE WAS LAID ON MARCH 31st 1931 BY MARTIN MILLAR ESQ., COLLEGE WARDEN (followed by a list of Wardens).

St Saviour's College

The inscription reads: St SAVIOUR SOUTHWARK. REBUILT WEST BLOCK AND WEST WING OF NORTH BLOCK OPENED BY THE COLLEGE WARDEN COUNCILLOR J.J. FRENCH 15th SEPTEMBER 1962 (followed by a list of Wardens).

References (Accessed 31st December 2021)

http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com
https://boroughphotos.org (1)
https://boroughphotos.org (2)
https://boroughphotos.org (3)
https://boroughphotos.org (4)
https://boroughphotos.org (5)
https://boroughphotos.org (6)
https://moderngov.lambeth.gov.uk (1)
https://moderngov.lambeth.gov.uk (2)
www.british-history.ac.uk
www.francisfrith.com
www.london-se1.co.uk
www.ustsc.org.uk

Last updated 31st December 2021

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